Another artful example of augmented reality


On Facebook I discovered another beautiful example of augmented reality as art. Enjoy!

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Teens Are Turning Away from Facebook Because Tumblr Is Real, and Parent-Free – J.K. Trotter – The Atlantic Wire


The Atlantic Wire bills itself as “what matters now,” but where have they been? This is old news to participants. However, I like to see this empirically established by Pew.

Teenagers really are over Facebook. In February the social network warned investors that “our younger users … are aware of and actively engaging with other products and services similar to, or as a substitute for, Facebook.” And in April the investment bank Piper Jaffray reported that products and services like Tumblr and Twitter were further eroding Facebooks dominance among the Justin Bieber set. But why? In a deep report published on Tuesday, Pew Research explains that teenagers departing the social networks blue confines are looking for something more… real. More authentic. Which, ironically, was the initial draw of Facebook, one of the first social networks to require real names.

via Teens Are Turning Away from Facebook Because Tumblr Is Real, and Parent-Free – J.K. Trotter – The Atlantic Wire.

But yeah, scratch a Tumblog, and you’ll find an angst-ridden, geeky, anime fangirl/boy taking refuge in pseudonymity.

We know when Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sleeps – Quartz


One lingering digital remnant of Dzhokhar, caught in a Facebook photo (in a white cap, at left). David Green

One lingering digital remnant of Dzhokhar, caught in a Facebook photo (in a white cap, at left). David Green

A few tech-savvy people have uncovered an extraordinary amount of information about the Tsarnaev brothers in a short amount of time. This has so many interesting implications for law enforcement, journalism, and privacy in the digital age.

We know all this not because the FBI told us or because journalists went out and spoke to people—though there is a lot that the media has revealed in the same 12-hour-period—but because it can all be pieced together with some decent Googling. If you read Russian and know how to use Yandex and V Kontake, there is more public information yet.

 

Where it was once only reporters and the police who dug up information about people of interest, a whole nation is at it today. And for all the myriad concerns about privacy settings, cookies, data protection, automated surveillance, and Facebook, we reveal immense amounts of information about ourselves publicly, unthinkingly, and sometimes involuntarily.

via We know when Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sleeps – Quartz.

 

Yet we do not know the answers to the most important question we have, “Why?” As the article concludes, “We know when Dzhokhar sleeps but not what he dreams about.”

Facebook Knew I Was Gay Before My Family Did


This has implications for the privacy of messages shared on Facebook, and should give each of us pause.

When Matt (last name withheld for privacy) logged onto Facebook earlier this week, he was startled by the placement of a seemingly impossible ad on his News Feed: a rainbow-underwear-adorned banner for Rick Clemons (the California-based, self-appointed “Coming Out Coach”) that read, “COMING OUT? NEED HELP?”

Matt (who lives on the East Coast) did need help coming out. But as far as he knew, there was only one other person in the world who knew that but him.

Matt told BuzzFeed FWD in an email:

As many LGBT individuals know, for a time, the most closely held secret we have is our sexuality. Several nights ago, I texted a close and dear friend for advice on revealing such sensitive personal information. The next morning, I woke up to a “sponsored story” on my Facebook page that asked “Coming Out? Need help?” How did Facebook know such a specific ad would apply to my profile?

via Facebook Knew I Was Gay Before My Family Did.

Dropify Launches File Publishing App for Facebook


This is one of those apps that if you don’t have a use for it, you will develop one.

If you’re a musician, designer or anyone who regularly offers free downloads, here’s one app you may find useful to promote your wares on Facebook. Dropify comes courtesy of Germany-based Hike Social Apps, and integrates with Facebook to “make file downloads more social”, as it puts it.“Dropify changes the game of file downloads,” says co-founder and CEO, Chris Striepecke, ambitiously. “We provide a fun way for people to both publish and discover awesome free files. We make files social.”

via Dropify Launches File Publishing App for Facebook.

Social Media Death


Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

This would make an interesting topic in thanatology circles.

[View the story “Facebook flaw allows users to ‘kill’ friends” on Storify]

The Digital Self


Happiness is sensitizing colleagues to the security of their Facebook and e-mail and the wider implications.

…[F]or some time I have felt that social media has given us a “radically distributed biography.” …An autobiography might be written with a particular narrative, but each of the components of this narrative has been chosen from a particular performative standpoint, and as suggested, in a collaborative way.

Just as social networking sites allow us to visualize the underlying networks that already have existed, they now offer us a view into the postmodern self.

 

via Re-integrating the Self Narrative » Cyborgology.

Facebook Won’t Like This LinkedIn News | Wired Business | Wired.com


Happy Reid

This is the “business casual” of serious social network news.

LinkedIn might be the uptight suit of social networks, but it seems it wants some of the casual, after-hours club flair that is Facebook. Witness the news LinkedIn will add notifications, a productivity-undermining feature that lets you know when someone views your profile or “likes” something you’ve shared.

The notifications, which consist of icons and color highlighting in LinkedIn’s navigation bar, ape a very similar feature on Facebook. LinkedIn rolled out the notifications on its website, but says they will soon come to its iPhone, iPad, and Android software.

It seems odd for a workplace social network to deploy such an intentionally distracting feature. “You’ll never miss a comment or update to an engaging discussion about a news article or trending topic on LinkedIn,” the company says of notifications – as though that’s a good thing.

via Facebook Won’t Like This LinkedIn News | Wired Business | Wired.com.

Re-integrating the Self Narrative » Cyborgology


As friends and family are only now beginning to “get” the Facebook timeline, involuntarily, of course, I have revisited what I wrote in response to a Cyborgology post about a “radically distributed biography.” I kind of like that concept.

This is interesting, because I for some time I have felt that social media has given us a “radically distributed biography.” The timeline tries to reintegrate that, but only insofar as it is digitally dramaturgical. An autobiography might be written with a particular narrative, but each of the components of this narrative has been chosen from a particular performative standpoint, and as suggested, in a collaborative way.

Just as social networking sites allow us to visualize the underlying networks that already have existed, they now offer us a view into the postmodern self.

via Re-integrating the Self Narrative » Cyborgology.

Illinois Facebook Law Makes It Illegal For Employers To Ask For Logins


Illinois can be more progressive than we give it credit for. Score one for that state in being the second to protect online privacy from the prying eyes of HR departments. C’mon, make some Illinoise.

CHICAGO (AP) — Seeking to guard the privacy rights of the social networking generation, Illinois is making it illegal for employers to ask job applicants for passwords to their online profiles.

Gov. Pat Quinn signed the law Wednesday at the Illinois Institute of Technology, where several students lamented that online snooping by bosses has caused some to lose out on jobs and forced others to temporarily deactivate their online profiles.

Illinois is only the second state to have such a law on the books, and it leaves no exceptions — even for openings that require thorough background checks.

In their efforts to vet job applicants, some companies and government agencies have started asking for passwords to log in to a prospective employee’s accounts on social media sites, such as Facebook and Twitter. Civil liberties groups, social media users and others have criticized the practice as a serious invasion of privacy, likening it to handing over the keys to your house.

via Illinois Facebook Law Makes It Illegal For Employers To Ask For Logins.