Environmental Racism On Display In Google Earth Images


Environmental racism as seen from space, via Google Earth.

In an article by Mashable writer Matt Petronzio points to a report by journalist and ecologist Tim DeChant that uses Google Earth to determine the correlation between the wealth of a neighborhood and the number of trees that neighborhood has.

via Environmental Racism On Display In Google Earth Images. via Rhonda Ragsdale

 

What are the liberating possibilities of technology, and what is the impact of the digital divide on the ability of communities to organize for equality. Also, does inequality raise our carbon footprint? What implications might this have globally?

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Twitter Won’t Hand Over Data on Occupy Wall Street Protester


As these tweets were already publicly available, it appears this request was mainly for the purposes of intimidation.

Barely two weeks after the New York District Attorney asked Twitter to hand over data about an Occupy Wall Street protester, the company says it will not comply with the request, at least for the time being.

The D.A.’s office had sent a subpoena to the microblogging service’s headquarters seeking information about the account belonging to Jeffrey Rae, one of several hundred activists arrested during an Occupy Wall Street demonstration in New York on March 1.

via Twitter Won’t Hand Over Data on Occupy Wall Street Protester.

#Kony2012, Understanding Networked Symbolic Action & Why Slacktivism is Conceptually Misleading | technosociology


I like Zeynep Tufekci’s take on #Kony2012 over on her TechnoSociology Blog. I do tend to agree we have reached a new moment, when multiple voices can be mustered so quickly. I love the contrast between this issue and the run up to the Iraq war.

And social media streams are a new and important dynamic in how those narratives are formed—and, importantly, who gets to have a say. I usually do not like to proclaim new developments as “good” or “bad”—they are often a complex interaction of both. However, contrast the swift pushback against the simplistic and dangerous narrative of #stopkony with the lead up to the Iraq War of 2003. It was clear to many people at the time that the narrative being built up in the rush to war in Iraq was erroneous, dangerous and in many ways, irresponsible.  However, opposition voices –while loud, organized and including many —were drowned out by the gatekeepers—big media, Sunday talk shows, political powers…
In contrast the swift backlash against Kony2012 was loud, organized and, most importantly, also able to command attention. In just one day, I saw more human-rights experts and African and Ugandan voices on mainstream media than I do in a month or three.  My social media stream was flooded by critical and in-depth discussion about the topic, often from Ugandans or topic experts. This is a key way in which Kony2012 differs from, say, “We are the World” campaign in the eighties in which Africans never got to be anything beyond silent victims. People can now talk back a lot more effectively. Indeed, the spread of Kony2012 is likely going to be remembered as one of the early examples how emergent networked global publics can connect amongst each other and focus their –and everyone else’s—attention in a manner that would have hard to imagine just ten years ago.

via #Kony2012, Understanding Networked Symbolic Action & Why Slacktivism is Conceptually Misleading | technosociology.